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Thread: Hyperthyroidism

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    Hyperthyroidism

    I was diagnosed with Hyperthyroidism four years ago. When it appeared for the first time I had no idea what was wrong with me, with this illness there are so many symptoms all around the body. It effects you throughout your body because it controls the whole body's metabolism and rate everything works at. The thyroid is a gland in the neck, the biggest gland in the body infact and it secretes a harmone called thyroxine which controls the speed which everything works at. It can become over-active or under-active which ever way it goes if it is releasing too much thyroxine or not enough you can become ill and in more ways than you may imagine and there are many symptoms as a result of this. Also it can effect some people who have it in different ways than others. Unfortunatly it is quite a common illness and can effect 1-10 woman and 1-100 men.

    The way to diagnose this illness is through blood tests through a general practitioner they can always find out a persons thyroxine level in their blood and once diagnosed they can do a lot about it thankfully. Someone who has this illness once being diagnosed should then see a consultant in this field through their G.P then the consultant will arrange regualar blood testing and appointmentsto look at the blood results every few months and so on to frequently check your thyroxine levels. In this process they will recommend the right dosage of thyroxine to take or other medications depending on the blood tests in front of them and the patient will gradually feel much better so long as they proceed with regular blood testing and appointments with their consultant and whatever other advice the consultant given them.

    This illness can be controlled to the point where a person feels 100% again or near that and they can lead a completely normal life just like anybody else so long as they stay on the recommended dosage of medication. This illness is bad but if treated it should not lead to further problems and a person can eventually feel just like they did before they developed it, it is merely an unfortunate set back.

    If anybody has any questions about it feel free to send me a private message or leave a question below here and I will answer. I find it's good to talk with an actual person who has gone through the same things as you. Also here is an article about it which some people may find useful.

    http://www.endocrineweb.com/conditio...hyroid-gland-0 Take care everybody

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    WineKitty's Avatar
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    I had my annual well person checkup last week. One of the tests ordered was a TSH. I thought the GP was wasting my time and blood, since I have been tested before and always fell in "normal" range...although the number moved from the low end to the high end a few times. I have all the symptoms of hypothyroid. The test came back at 6.79 which is quite high. I am almost glad though because now I know that some of the things I have been feeling are real and not in my head. I am going to make an appointment (assuming I can get in) with a specialist as I don't trust my GP to handle this correctly. She only tested my TSH and then my FT4 after me basically twisting arms. They did NOT do a FT3 or TPO. > She prescribed .50 mcg of levothyroxine but I will not take it until I see the other doc. Without the followup tests I am at a loss to understand how she can prescribe any drug. I just hope I can get in with the specialist in a reasonable amount of time.

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    Quote WineKitty View Post
    I had my annual well person checkup last week. One of the tests ordered was a TSH. I thought the GP was wasting my time and blood, since I have been tested before and always fell in "normal" range...although the number moved from the low end to the high end a few times. I have all the symptoms of hypothyroid. The test came back at 6.79 which is quite high. I am almost glad though because now I know that some of the things I have been feeling are real and not in my head. I am going to make an appointment (assuming I can get in) with a specialist as I don't trust my GP to handle this correctly. She only tested my TSH and then my FT4 after me basically twisting arms. They did NOT do a FT3 or TPO. > She prescribed .50 mcg of levothyroxine but I will not take it until I see the other doc. Without the followup tests I am at a loss to understand how she can prescribe any drug. I just hope I can get in with the specialist in a reasonable amount of time.
    What is FT3 and TPO? I can understand why your doctor prescribed thyroxine. You had a high TSH, so you should start treating it asap, and 50 mcg is the lowest starting dose.

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    When a TSH is out of normal range, often (but not always) the lab will automatically "reflex" (meaning adding on another test) called a Free T4. To get a truly clear picture, a doctor should be doing a Free T3 and Free T4, along with the TSH. In my particular case, a TPO or Thyroid Peroxidase antibody test should have been done (but wasn't). A TPO is what distinguishes the cause thyroid dysfunction and can detect autoimmune disorder. That and other testing ( helps identify the different types of thyroid dysfunction such as Hashimoto's, Graves, and even thyroid cancer. It is my belief that I have Hashimoto's --although I am not a doctor and could be wrong. I start my medication tomorrow. I work in a hospital lab and we do a lot of thyroid testing so I am fortunate enough to have information and knowledge about thyroid conditions.

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    Quote WineKitty View Post
    When a TSH is out of normal range, often (but not always) the lab will automatically "reflex" (meaning adding on another test) called a Free T4. To get a truly clear picture, a doctor should be doing a Free T3 and Free T4, along with the TSH. In my particular case, a TPO or Thyroid Peroxidase antibody test should have been done (but wasn't). A TPO is what distinguishes the cause thyroid dysfunction and can detect autoimmune disorder. That and other testing ( helps identify the different types of thyroid dysfunction such as Hashimoto's, Graves, and even thyroid cancer. It is my belief that I have Hashimoto's --although I am not a doctor and could be wrong. I start my medication tomorrow. I work in a hospital lab and we do a lot of thyroid testing so I am fortunate enough to have information and knowledge about thyroid conditions.
    Oh right. Then I've had that test (I have hashimoto). I thought they had done the antibody test with you too but did not realise what it was called.

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    I only today began Synthroid and have to wait potentially months to get to the right level. I will be so glad to feel better. I have been dealing with so many low grade symptoms, and fatigue that only gets worse and worse, that I was beginning to think I was crazy. I am just glad to know that there is hope.

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