Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    metamorphosis's Avatar
    Forum Addiction:

    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    392
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    A short list of herbs and vitamins, minerals, and other supplementation for SAD!

    This is a thread gleamed on some research and my on knowledged. Just by reading the title, there is know way I would know to cover everything. Hopefully, what I did cover benefits some!

    Part One-

    Overall studies on nutritional and herbal supplements for anxiety:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2959081/
    http://www.biomedcentral.com/content...5-2891-7-2.pdf http://nancyadlerjones.psychology.co...-disorders.pdf
    http://li123-4.members.linode.com/fi...eatments_0.pdf

    Treating anxiety with amino acid supplementation:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16117182


    *L-Theanine- Found in green tea and is sold as a supplement. It is able to cross the blood–brain barrier, theanine has psychoactive properties. Theanine has been studied for its potential ability to reduce mental and physical stress. its primary effect seems to increase the overall level of the brain inhibitory transmitter GABA. Theanine also increases brain dopamine levels. Although most of the benefits of L-theanine are experienced with doses of 50-400mg, the typical green tea sold in North America contains less than 10mg of L-theanine per serving. The finest grades of green tea sold in Japan may have much more L-theanine (as high as 50mg per serving) but this grade of tea is very hard to find in North America.
    Dr. Teitelbaum
    Board certified internist and director of the Annapolis Research Center for Effective CFS/Fibromyalgia Therapies.

    L-theanine works in a couple ways, according to Teitelbaum. First, it directly stimulates the production of alpha brain waves, which are associated with a relaxed-but-alert state of mind, similar to the state meditation achieves. Secondly, he explains, L-theanine is involved in the formation of the neurotransmitter GABA, which calms you while you’re awake but deepens sleep at night. “L-theanine also naturally stimulates the release of the ‘happiness molecules’ serotonin and dopamine.” One study earlier this year, conducted by researchers at the program in Cognitive Neuroscience at the City University in New York, found that by boosting people’s alpha brain waves, L-theanine helped people stay more focused and responsive while performing mundane tasks. Teitelbaum suggests 50 to 200 mg of L-theanine, which is identical to the amino acid found in green tea, a few times a day.
    Studies:
    ScienceDirect.com - Biological Psychology - l-Theanine reduces psychological and physiological stress responses
    Google Translate
    L-theanine, a natural constituent in te... [Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2008] - PubMed - NCBI

    *Glutamine- L- Glutamine is the most abundant free amino acid found in the muscles of the body. Because it can readily pass the blood-brain barrier, it is known as brain fuel. In the brain, glutamine is converted into glutamic acid—which is essential for cerebral function—and vice versa. It also increases the amount of Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is needed to sustain proper brain function and mental activity. It assists in maintaining the proper acid/alkaline balance in the body and is the basis of the building blocks for the synthesis of RNA and DNA. It promotes mental ability and the maintenance of a healthy digestive tract. Glutamine is the precursor to another amino acid known as GABA, or gamma-aminobutyric acid. GABA is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in your brain, meaning that it has a calming effect on your nervous system. In her book, "Prevention of the Disease of Aging," Dr. Katherine Blanchett states that GABA helps to decrease the number of anxiety-related messages in your brain by inhibiting neuron firing. Because glutamine increases GABA production, it is thought that glutamine can also help to decrease symptoms of anxiety. Anxiety symptoms include feelings of worry, fatigue, irritability, tension, mood changes, sleep disturbances and cognitive difficulties. However, only one clinical supports the benefits of glutamine supplementation on symptoms of anxiety.
    http://neurogenesis.com/amino-acids/glutamine/
    http://scholar.google.com/scholar?st...t=0,6&as_vis=1
    http://www.howtochangeyourownbatteri...ine-Report.pdf

    *Arginine- Dietary supplementation of L-arginine taken in combination with L-lysine has been shown potentially useful in treating people subjected to high levels of mental stress and anxiety, in a double-blind, placebo controlled and randomized study, involving 108 Japanese adults. Trait anxiety and state anxiety induced by cognitive stress battery was significantly reduced and basal levels of the stress hormone cortisol was decreased.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17510493

    *Tyrosine-Tyrosine, a simple amino acid, is the precursor for several important neurotransmitters, including dopamine1 and norepinephrine.
    http://www.nutritionj.com/content/7/1/2
    http://www.wellnessresources.com/stu..._under_stress/
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12955284

    *Valerian root- Valerian extracts appear to have some affinity for the GABAA receptor.It is believed that valerian root has an impact on the availability of the neurotransmitter GABA in the brain. it is used for calming the central nervous system in order to treat sleeplessness or insomnia. The supplements prepared from the roots of this herb are largely used all over the world to promote sleep, which in turn can reduce the level of anxiety. So, apart from being recognized as a sleep aid, valerian root has found wide scale popularity for reducing anxiety and stress as well, mainly due to its tranquilizing effect. It has been acknowledged to be very effective in improving the quality of sleep and reducing nervousness, irritability, depression, nervous tension and hysteria. Its main advantage over the commonly used prescription medications for insomnia is that, it does not produce morning 'grogginess' and 'sleep hangover', as it is non addictive in nature.
    Elsevier

    *Magnesium-A clinical trial recently conducted in France through the double-blind, randomized, placebo method with total participants of 264 people diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder showed a statistically significant reduction in anxiety and depression in the group who was given the herbal treatment with 300 mg of magnesium. I recommend pwd magnesium glycinate. It is more tolerable on the bowels than other forms. Magnesium naturally calms the nervous system and the muscles; whereas, a deficiency can result in a tense body and an anxious mind.
    Eating foods that are rich in magnesium is an important step in correcting a magnesium deficiency naturally. Magnesium can be found most abundantly in coconut water, kelp, cashews, buckwheat, molasses, brazil nuts, pumpkin seeds, cocoa powder and rice bran.Those with anxiety will often benefit from magnesium supplementation. Start with 200 mg per day and work your way up to the most effective dose. Too much magnesium may cause loose stools. If this occurs, either cut back on your dose or divide it into smaller doses throughout the day. Most people find that 400-800 mg taken in divided doses will ease their anxiety symptoms considerably.
    Magnesium citrate, magnesium glycinate and magnesium chloride are among the most absorbable forms of magnesium. Magnesium oil and epsom salts can also be used externally to boost magnesium levels.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19085527
    http://george-eby-research.com/html/...n-anxiety.html
    http://george-eby-research.com/html/...depression.pdf
    Foods high in magnesium:
    http://www.vaughns-1-pagers.com/food...sium-foods.htm

    *Omega-3 Essential Fatty Acids-The data for anxiety disorders is —lower omega-3 plasma levels are found in folks with social anxiety.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21784145
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21279554
    http://journals.lww.com/psychopharma...nxiety.19.aspx

    all about fats-
    http://primalmeded.com/2011/08/09/fat-glorious-fat-ii/

    *B-Complex Vitamins
    People suffering from stress and anxiety or drink or smoke deplete the B vitamins more rapidly. B vitamins are essential for the nervous system to function properly. B vitamins are particularly concentrated in meat such as turkey and tuna, in liver and meat products. Good sources for B vitamins include kombucha, whole grains, potatoes, bananas, lentils, chili peppers, tempeh, beans, nutritional yeast, brewer's yeast, and molasses.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15671130
    http://www.mashpedia.com/B_vitamins

    A blog:B-Vitamins, Mood, and Methylation — It’s Complicated
    http://jdmoyer.com/2011/09/03/b-vita...s-complicated/

    B1-Helps reduce anxiety and has a calming effect on the nerves. Thiamine is found in a wide variety of foods at low concentrations. Cereal grains are the most important dietary sources of thiamine. Whole grains contain more thiamine than refined grains, as thiamine is found mostly in the outer layers of the grain and in the germ (which are removed during the refining process).foods rich in thiamine are oatmeal, flax, and sunflower seeds, brown rice, whole grain rye, asparagus, kale, cauliflower, potatoes, oranges, liver (beef, pork, and chicken), and eggs.



    __________________

  2. #2
    metamorphosis's Avatar
    Forum Addiction:

    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    392
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    A short list of herbs and vitamins, minerals, and other supplementation for SAD!

    Part 2-

    B6- Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, the primary role of vitamin B6 is to act as a coenzyme to many other enzymes in the body that are involved predominantly in metabolism. Pyridoxal phosphate, the metabolically active form of vitamin B6, is involved in many aspects of macronutrient metabolism, neurotransmitter synthesis, histamine synthesis, hemoglobin synthesis and function and gene expression. Pyridoxal phosphate is involved in almost all amino acid metabolism, from synthesis to breakdown. Vitamin B6 is also required for the conversion of tryptophan to niacin, so low vitamin B6 status will impair this conversion. Pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzymes play a role in the biosynthesis of four important neurotransmitters: serotonin, epinephrine, norepinephrine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Good food sources include meats, whole grain products, vegetables, nuts and bananas. Cooking, storage and processing losses of vitamin B6 vary and in some foods may be more than 50%. Deficiency can cause impaired
    tryptophan-niacin conversion. Mental depression is another condition which may result from low vitamin B6 intake. Because of pyridoxine's role in serotonin and other neurotransmitter production, supplementation often helps depressed people feel better, and their moods improve significantly.

    B12- Cobalamin plays a key role in the normal functioning of the brain and nervous system, and for the formation of blood. At levels only slightly lower than normal, a range of symptoms such as fatigue, depression, and poor memory may be experienced. Vitamin B12 has extremely low toxicity and even taking it in enormous doses appears not to be harmful to healthy individuals. Absorption of food vitamin B12 requires an intact and functioning stomach, exocrine pancreas, intrinsic factor, and small bowel. Problems with any one of these organs makes a vitamin B12 deficiency possible. Vitamin B12 is found in foods that come from animals, including fish and shellfish, meat (especially liver), poultry, eggs, milk, and milk products. Vegans will lack B12 unless they consume B12-containing dietary supplements or B12-fortified foods. Examples of fortified foods include fortified breakfast cereals, fortified soy products, fortified energy bars, and fortified nutritional yeast. Vitamin B12 supplements are effective for preventing deficiencies, especially in vegetarians. Recently sublingual methylcobalamin has become available in 1 mg tablets. Such tablets have higher bioavailability than the older cyanocobalamin
    http://jop.sagepub.com/content/19/1/59.short

    *l-methylfolate-Is the natural, active form of folic acid used at the cellular level for DNA reproduction.Approximately 10% of the general population lack the enzymes needed to receive any benefit from folic acid. Another 40% of the population appear to convert only a limited amount of folic acid into levomefolic acid. They cannot fully process supplemental folic acid at RDA or higher dose levels. Folate has been linked to the performance of SSRI drugs. Many patients have required folate supplementation in order to adequately respond to standard treatment protocol. Folate status has been linked to the efficacy of neural transmitters and cognitive performance. Only active, levomefolic acid can cross the blood brain barrier. Methylfolate is considered a medicinal food by the FDA. It is used as a dietary management of suboptimal l-methylfolate levels in patients with major depressive disorder.
    http://www.cnsspectrums.com/aspx/art...nal_Mechanism_
    http://cdn.neiglobal.com/content/blo...thylfolate.pdf
    http://www.psy-world.com/739-744_100...tahl_stamp.pdf

    Vitamin D- is a fat-soluble vitamin that is naturally present in very few foods, added to others, and available as a dietary supplement. It is also produced endogenously when ultraviolet rays from sunlight strike the skin and trigger vitamin D synthesis. Very few foods in nature contain vitamin D. The flesh of fatty fish (such as salmon, tuna, and mackerel) and fish liver oils are among the best sources.Small amounts of vitamin D are found in beef liver, cheese, and egg yolks. Vitamin D in these foods is primarily in the form of vitamin D3. Fortified foods provide most of the vitamin D in the American diet for example cow's milk and soy milk. Ready-to-eat breakfast cereals often contain added vitamin D, as do some brands of orange juice, yogurt, margarine and other food products.The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2005–2006, estimated vitamin D intakes from both food and dietary supplements [4,23]. Average intake levels for males from foods alone ranged from 204 to 288 IU/day; for females the range was 144 to 276 IU/day. When use of dietary supplements was considered, these values were substantially increased (37% of the U.S. population used a dietary supplement containing vitamin D.)
    http://www.vitaminddeficiencysymptom...y-and-anxiety/

    Passionflower
    This herb is commonly used to help a person relax and get rid of anxiety and stress. And studies show that it works against restlessness as well.
    Dose: Take 250 mg to 2,000 mg (2 grams) of the raw herb three times daily or use 5 to 10 mL of the tincture formulation up to four times daily
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15750663
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22254110

    Lavender
    Studies done in dental offices show that the aromatherapy with oils of lavender and orange reduced anxiety, improved mood and increased alertness in dental patients.
    Another double-blinded clinical study showed that lavender oil was as effective as lorazepam (Ativan) for reducing generalized anxiety.
    Dose: Tincture (1:5) - Use 60 drops daily.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22984571

    Lysine
    One Japanse study showed that healthy subjects given a combination lysine and arginine supplement reduced their stress and anxiety levels significantly.
    Dose: Take 2.5 g of lyine and 2.5 g of arginine daily. Also it is a good idea to find out which types of foods are naturally high in lysine. You are likely able to get all the lysine you'll need via your diet.

    Lemon Balm
    Some studies completed in children under 12 years of age showed that lemon balm combined with valerian helped with restlessness and nervous muscle movements.
    Dose: The study in children used 80 mg of lemon balm leaf extract and 160 mg of valerian root extract. Take one or two doses up to twice daily.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3230760/
    http://www.psy-world.com/739-744_100...tahl_stamp.pdf

    Zinc
    One well-designed study suggested that low blood levels of zinc is linked to a higher risk of developing anxiety disorders and depression.
    Dose: Take 10 to 40 mg daily.

    *Melatonin
    Many biological effects of melatonin are produced through activation of melatonin receptors, while others are due to its role as a pervasive and powerful antioxidant, with a particular role in the protection of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Melatonin is produced by the pineal gland, a small endocrine gland located in the center of the brain but outside the blood–brain barrier. The melatonin signal forms part of the system that regulates the sleep-wake cycle by chemically causing drowsiness and lowering the body temperature. Melatonin is an antioxidant that can easily cross cell membranes and the blood–brain barrier. Melatonin works with other antioxidants to improve the overall effectiveness from each antioxidant.Melatonin is an anti-oxidant and suppressant of tumor development that is produced at night; when someone works in artificial light, they generally have lower melatonin and may be more likely to develop cancer. Melatonin supplements may simulate the melatonin production at different times that does not occur during regular sleeping hours for people who work night shifts
    Dose: Take 1 to 3 mg 1 hour prior to going to sleep. Start by taking .5-1mgs before increasing
    http://www.encognitive.com/node/12271
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...9.00118.x/full

    Chamomile
    Using the herb chamomile for anxiety treatment is still a popular choice.
    Indeed, chamomile tea is commonly suggested for this reason.
    Animal as well as human research trials suggest that chamomile contains substances that can be very helpful in reducing anxiety and stress levels.
    Dose: Drink one cup of chamomile tea up to three times daily.

    SAMe
    SAMe is described as a "natural antidepressant" and is involved in over forty biochemical processes in our body. It has a calming effect and can be helpful in treating anxiety disorders.
    If anxiety is complicated with depression. It can help reduce both depression and anxiety symptoms.
    Dose: usually start with 400 mg once or twice daily to start. Clinical studies have used up to 1,600 mg daily. Avoid taking this supplement if you suffer from manic-depressive disorder or are taking prescription anti-depressant medications.
    http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/76/5/1151S.long

    If you are taking any medications, Consult with your physician before starting some of the above. The supplements that could cause possible interactions, including serotonin syndrome (5-htp, SAMe) have warnings in bold text.

    Also crucial are lifestyle choices-
    Get plenty of exercise including cardio and weight bearing

    Eat healthy with a diet:
    http://www.health-heart.org/goodfood.htm
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/0...n_1636409.html
    http://www.dwlz.com/HealthyLife/healthy50.html

    and sleep:
    http://www.stanford.edu/~dement/howto.html
    http://yoursleep.aasmnet.org/hygiene.aspx



    __________________

  3. #3
    Ironman's Avatar
    Forum Addiction:

    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,260
    Mentioned
    21 Post(s)
    This product has lemon balm, 1.5mg melatonin, chamomile, and lavender


  4. #4
    Forum Addiction:

    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    1,314
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Not for SAD, but if you have acid reflux, try Apple Cider Vinegar. It works much, much better than the pills over the counter.

  5. #5
    Forum Addiction:

    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,006
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Sure there are lists but what I want to know is who has been trying these and what results do they have after testing it?

    For example I have taken B vitamins and I have also tried the St. John's wort. They have zero effect on me.

  6. #6
    kc1895's Avatar KFC Hipster
    Forum Addiction:

    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    500
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Quote Misssy View Post
    Sure there are lists but what I want to know is who has been trying these and what results do they have after testing it?

    For example I have taken B vitamins and I have also tried the St. John's wort. They have zero effect on me.
    St. John's Wort smells like stinky socks

  7. #7
    Forum Addiction:

    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,006
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    kc I think you are thinking of valerian that does smell unpleasant but I don't care what something smells like if it helps I would take it

  8. #8
    WineKitty's Avatar
    Forum Addiction:

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    344
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    You do have to be careful with interactions though, esp if you are taking regular meds.

    But, that said, I am a STRONG BELIEVER in alternative and more natural things. I find essential oils to help me quite a bit, just getting into them, have much to learn. I know they have done wonders for my allergies.

    I also use lavender or a frankincense blend for calming. I spend money on the GOOD stuff, doterra, because you can ingest (some of them), use topically or diffuse.

    That is an interesting list and I will have to look into some of those supplements. Thanks for a great post!!!!!!!!!!
    "You can never really know a person and if you think you can, you're living in a fucking dream world!" David Fisher, Six Feet Under

  9. #9
    takethebiscuit's Avatar
    Forum Addiction:

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    172
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    I'm not against using natural supplements/natural alternatives to medications. I don't like the "pop a pill" culture that turns up in health care systems around the globe. I am concerned that some manufacturers imply that just because something is "natural" it means that it's "good". There are things in nature which can kill you in a very short space of time. There are a huge variety of poisons in nature and we've all got different body chemistry.

    Consult your doctor before taking any herbal/natural supplements. There's some evidence that a small amount of Valerian root is enough to cause an allergic reaction in those who are allergic to Valerian.

    There's some evidence that 5-htp can cause a very serious bone disease.

    Herbal/natural products are not medicines. The effect of taking such things will, most likely, be different than taking a medication prescribed by your doctor.

    St John's Wart can cause your skin to become very vulnerable to UV rays if you already do not take the sun too well as it is. That said, there is a fair amount of evidence that it may work to some degree in improving mood, combating depression etc.

Made with <3
Anxiety Space is not a replacement for a fully qualified doctor.