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Thread: Do I Have BDD?

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    Do I Have BDD?

    I have recently come across the term Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) and I'm not sure if I have it or not. Growing up I always tried to wear hats in order to cover my face because I was constantly bullied for my acne in elementary school. When high school came around, hats were forbidden from the dress code so I couldnt wear them anymore. I tried using different facial products and my face started to clear up, but i avoided social situations and went through high school with only a couple of good friends. I was still shy around them and rarely wanted to go out because I was afraid I didn't look good enough. I have trouble looking at myself in any mirror and constantly shower at least a couple of times a day because I fear I might smell bad. When I do look into the mirror I scrutinize my appearance and spend nearly half an hour grooming myself. I feel way too insecure.

    I've never seen a therapist before. Is this BDD or something else?

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    It could be BDD or Social phobic, which has the same signs.

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    I just did a bit of reading on BDD and it looks like you might have it since you feel insecure about your body. Like Finn said it could also be social phobia. I would recommend seeing a therapist in order to get a proper diagnosis. It's better to know for certain than to be constantly worrying about what if's

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    I guess the best thing would be to see a therapist. I've been thinking it over and done further research on it so I guess that's the next logical step.

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    I've been diagnosed with it. Sounds like there's a good chance you have it too.

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    Antidote's Avatar Rude & Shouty
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    You definitely have traits. I don't really bother determining whether I fit full criteria for a diagnosis anymore. I just figure, if you have prominent traits of something then you have a problem.

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    I did visit a professional recently and they also agreed I exhibited traits of it. Do you guys go under any therapy or medication for it?

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    Quote Oswell View Post
    I did visit a professional recently and they also agreed I exhibited traits of it. Do you guys go under any therapy or medication for it?
    Medication for it would be the same antidepressants used for other depressive issues. Usually the doctors here (US) prescribe an SNRI (usually Zoloft, or generic Zoloft) for depression with an anxiety component that involves an obsessive thought process.

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    There are several types of bipolar and related disorders. For each type, the exact symptoms of bipolar disorder can vary from person to person. Bipolar I and bipolar II disorders also have additional specific features that can be added to the diagnosis based on your particular signs and symptoms.

    Bipolar I disorder. You've had at least one manic episode. The manic episode may be preceded by or followed by hypomanic or major depressive episodes. Mania symptoms cause significant impairment in your life and may require hospitalization or trigger a break from reality (psychosis).

    Bipolar II disorder. You've had at least one major depressive episode lasting at least two weeks and at least one hypomanic episode lasting at least four days, but you've never had a manic episode. Major depressive episodes or the unpredictable changes in mood and behaviour can cause distress or difficulty in areas of your life.

    A manic episode is a distinct period of abnormally and persistently elevated, expansive or irritable mood that lasts at least one week (or less than a week if hospitalization is necessary). The episode includes persistently increased goal-directed activity or energy.

    A hypomanic episode is a distinct period of abnormally and persistently elevated, expansive or irritable mood that lasts at least four consecutive days.

    For both a manic and a hypomanic episode, during the period of disturbed mood and increased energy, three or more of the following symptoms (four if the mood is only irritable) must be present and represent a noticeable change from your usual behavior:

    Inflated self-esteem or grandiosity
    Decreased need for sleep (for example, you feel rested after only three hours of sleep)
    Unusual talkativeness
    Racing thoughts
    Distractibility
    Increased goal-directed activity (either socially, at work or school, or sexually) or agitation
    Doing things that are unusual and that have a high potential for painful consequences — for example, unrestrained buying sprees, sexual indiscretions or foolish business investments
    To be considered a manic episode:

    The mood disturbance must be severe enough to cause noticeable difficulty at work, at school or in social activities or relationships; or to require hospitalization to prevent harm to yourself or others; or to trigger a break from reality (psychosis).

    Symptoms are not due to the direct effects of something else, such as alcohol or drug use; a medication; or a medical condition.

    To be considered a hypomanic episode:

    The episode is a distinct change in mood and functioning that is not characteristic of you when the symptoms are not present, and enough of a change that other people notice.
    The episode isn't severe enough to cause significant difficulty at work, at school or in social activities or relationships, and it doesn't require hospitalization or trigger a break from reality.
    Symptoms are not due to the direct effects of something else, such as alcohol or drug use; a medication; or a medical condition
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